Cosmic Injustice

A topic we haven’t talked specifically about yet over the past few months has been sibling amiability. In some of the interviews that we have conducted, there is this notion that the sibling that will be taking on the caretaker role later in life does not actually have an amicable relationship with his or her sibling and yet takes on the role regardless.

We spoke with a young man, George*, in LA about this struggle.  George is a philosophy PhD candidate as well as a J.D. student at UCLA. He is eloquent and reflective and was a pleasure to speak with about his younger brother.  George’s brother is one year younger than he and has an intellectual impairment. In the beginning of our interview with George, it appeared that he and his brother had a pretty decent relationship. He said they fought a lot as kids, but most brothers do, and that he doesn’t think he was “traumatized” or “burdened” by the experiences he had growing up in his house.

Here is where his story gets increasingly interesting. George talked a lot about how he doesn’t think that his brother really likes him. He told us that if something were to happen to his parents and his brother had to move in with him, he would be okay with that situation but he doesn’t think his brother would be too happy.  He even told us that his brother has connected more with his friends and girlfriends and if his brother had to move in with him, he might have to use one of them as a mouthpiece while he acted as a “man behind the curtain.” He told us that his brother is “really good with people, just not me or my dad.” We tried to dissect this a little bit more. George told us that growing up his dad was always the disciplinarian in the house in comparison to his mom who focused more on providing a loving, calm household. George confided in us that he often sided with his father’s view that manners should be stressed and healthy regimen should be implemented when possible. He believes that his brother is high-functioning enough to have had more responsibility than he did have growing up.

What’s fascinating about George’s story is not only how much of his life George is willing to alter in order to take care of his brother should that have to happen but also how hard George is going to have to try to gain some of his brother’s trust and try to make a relationship with someone that is clearly not interested in making a relationship.

His philosophy student self came through by the end of the interview when he concluded that the whole situation is really a “cosmic injustice.”

Ellie

*name has been changed

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